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trifc.org shared BBC Ouch's Wheelchair yoga.

BBC Ouch
Yoga has many benefits for people of all abilities! Let's hope for more opportunities like this for people with disabilities in Nepal!
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Isn't this a great idea? 💡💡 Nina uses yoga to help wheelchair users stay supple

trifc.org added an event.

In Fall, 2018 TRIFC Founder, Rob Rose and TRIFC Director, Rose Stevens will be leading an 18‑day adventure tour to Nepal, departing Seattle on October 27 and returning November 13. If you join them on this amazing journey, you’ll learn about the culture and history of Nepal and have a jungle experience in Chitwan National Park, the jewel of Nepal’s national park system. Plus, you’ll have an easy trekking experience with spectacular views of the Himalayas as well as several life-affirming volunteer experiences with children with disabilities.
Please contact Rob Rose- rob@trifc.org if you are interested in the trip, want additional information, or if you have any questions.
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Is traveling to exotic Kathmandu, Nepal, on your personal “bucket list”? Watch this short video where four Rotarians share their Nepal trip experiences: youtu.be/iTHmSvgubgY
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trifc.org added 4 new photos.

Happy New Year from everyone at TRIFC in the USA and our partner organization, ADSoN in Nepal! These photos are New Years greetings from our hearing-impaired students at Purwanchal School for the Deaf in Dharan. Also included in the group photo is school principal, Ms. Renuka Budhathoki.
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Happy New Year from everyone at TRIFC in the USA and our partner organization, ADSoN in Nepal!  These photos are New Years greetings from our hearing-impaired students at Purwanchal School for the Deaf in Dharan.  Also included in the group photo is school principal, Ms. Renuka Budhathoki.

Beautiful wishes 2018. 🙏🏼

2 months ago   ·  1
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Very good drawing from p.d.s.

2 months ago
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trifc.org shared their post.

An example of how we can all make a difference.
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Doing The Right Thing… On the return leg of our volunteer group’s short trek out of Pokhara, we stopped to take a rest break. Just as we sat down on a rock wall beside a small village hut, an old woman greeted us and implored us to help her. She said she was in great pain. I know from previous experience that this kind of request is often made of foreigners as many times they are mistakenly thought to be doctors! But as our guides Tapan & Mitra spoke further with this woman we learned that she was blind, that she had recently fallen, hurt her wrist and shoulder and was in great pain. We scrambled to help as best we could with our limited first-aid supplies. My friend Stu started looking for something that would serve as a splint and he found an old rubber sandal which worked perfectly as a wrist ‘sandwich’. I had some elastic tape which wrapped around the ‘sandwich’ and Tapan and Stu fashioned a sling for her arm to keep it stable. Roberta found some ibuprofen which we left with the family along with strict instructions on how and when to take it. Taking the blind woman’s two granddaughters with us, we set off for Pokhara where we would send the granddaughters back with more medical supplies. The old woman’s name was Biva and her two granddaughters were both named Puja (they were cousins). We reached a small town and purchased some basic medicines and an ace bandage at a pharmacy shop. The granddaughters let us know that a local health care worker would visit their grandmother and check on her soon. I gave them each a candy bar, some money for lunch and we said goodbye, for now. We returned to Kathmandu but the image of that woman’s pained face stayed with me. I continued to worry. Tapan told me that she came from a low-caste family so it might be difficult for them to get, or afford help. I asked if we could check on Biva and both he and Mitra thought that this was a definite possibility. Once I returned home to Bellevue we set a plan in-motion whereby Tapan would return with a porter (Bhim) and, if necessary carry Biva to the hospital in Pokhara for treatment. As you can see from the photos, that is exactly what happened! Tapan carried Biva down the many difficult steps and helped her get to the hospital where she was further treated for her wrist injury. After treatment Tapan and Bhim helped Biva get back to her village home where she can continue to recuperate with medicines from the hospital. In my mind, once we came across Biva, we had a responsibility to help. It reminded me of a portion of a quote from Helen Keller, “I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do something I can do”. As a group and with the help of our Nepali friends I feel that we did our best to help. My thanks and gratitude to Tapan, Mitra and Bhim for taking the extra steps to ‘do the right thing’!

An example of how we can all make a difference.

James Markert ❤

2 months ago   ·  1
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trifc.org added 7 new photos.

Doing The Right Thing…

On the return leg of our volunteer group’s short trek out of Pokhara, we stopped to take a rest break. Just as we sat down on a rock wall beside a small village hut, an old woman greeted us and implored us to help her. She said she was in great pain. I know from previous experience that this kind of request is often made of foreigners as many times they are mistakenly thought to be doctors! But as our guides Tapan & Mitra spoke further with this woman we learned that she was blind, that she had recently fallen, hurt her wrist and shoulder and was in great pain.

We scrambled to help as best we could with our limited first-aid supplies. My friend Stu started looking for something that would serve as a splint and he found an old rubber sandal which worked perfectly as a wrist ‘sandwich’. I had some elastic tape which wrapped around the ‘sandwich’ and Tapan and Stu fashioned a sling for her arm to keep it stable. Roberta found some ibuprofen which we left with the family along with strict instructions on how and when to take it. Taking the blind woman’s two granddaughters with us, we set off for Pokhara where we would send the granddaughters back with more medical supplies. The old woman’s name was Biva and her two granddaughters were both named Puja (they were cousins).

We reached a small town and purchased some basic medicines and an ace bandage at a pharmacy shop. The granddaughters let us know that a local health care worker would visit their grandmother and check on her soon. I gave them each a candy bar, some money for lunch and we said goodbye, for now.

We returned to Kathmandu but the image of that woman’s pained face stayed with me. I continued to worry. Tapan told me that she came from a low-caste family so it might be difficult for them to get, or afford help. I asked if we could check on Biva and both he and Mitra thought that this was a definite possibility. Once I returned home to Bellevue we set a plan in-motion whereby Tapan would return with a porter (Bhim) and, if necessary carry Biva to the hospital in Pokhara for treatment. As you can see from the photos, that is exactly what happened! Tapan carried Biva down the many difficult steps and helped her get to the hospital where she was further treated for her wrist injury. After treatment Tapan and Bhim helped Biva get back to her village home where she can continue to recuperate with medicines from the hospital.

In my mind, once we came across Biva, we had a responsibility to help. It reminded me of a portion of a quote from Helen Keller, “I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do something I can do”. As a group and with the help of our Nepali friends I feel that we did our best to help.

My thanks and gratitude to Tapan, Mitra and Bhim for taking the extra steps to ‘do the right thing’!
... See MoreSee Less

Doing The Right Thing…

On the return leg of our volunteer group’s short trek out of Pokhara, we stopped to take a rest break.  Just as we sat down on a rock wall beside a small village hut, an old woman greeted us and implored us to help her.  She said she was in great pain.  I know from previous experience that this kind of request is often made of foreigners as many times they are mistakenly thought to be doctors!  But as our guides Tapan & Mitra spoke further with this woman we learned that she was blind, that she had recently fallen, hurt her wrist and shoulder and was in great pain.  

We scrambled to help as best we could with our limited first-aid supplies.  My friend Stu started looking for something that would serve as a splint and he found an old rubber sandal which worked perfectly as a wrist ‘sandwich’.  I had some elastic tape which wrapped around the ‘sandwich’ and Tapan and Stu fashioned a sling for her arm to keep it stable.  Roberta found some ibuprofen which we left with the family along with strict instructions on how and when to take it.  Taking the blind woman’s two granddaughters with us, we set off for Pokhara where we would send the granddaughters back with more medical supplies.  The old woman’s name was Biva and her two granddaughters were both named Puja (they were cousins).

We reached a small town and purchased some basic medicines and an ace bandage at a pharmacy shop.  The granddaughters let us know that a local health care worker would visit their grandmother and check on her soon. I gave them each a candy bar, some money for lunch and we said goodbye, for now.  

We returned to Kathmandu but the image of that woman’s pained face stayed with me.  I continued to worry.  Tapan told me that she came from a low-caste family so it might be difficult for them to get, or afford help.  I asked if we could check on Biva and both he and Mitra thought that this was a definite possibility.  Once I returned home to Bellevue we set a plan in-motion whereby Tapan would return with a porter (Bhim) and, if necessary carry Biva to the hospital in Pokhara for treatment.  As you can see from the photos, that is exactly what happened!  Tapan carried Biva down the many difficult steps and helped her get to the hospital where she was further treated for her wrist injury.  After treatment Tapan and Bhim helped Biva get back to her village home where she can continue to recuperate with medicines from the hospital.

In my mind, once we came across Biva, we had a responsibility to help.  It reminded me of a portion of a quote from Helen Keller, “I cannot do everything, but still I can do something.  I will not refuse to do something I can do”.  As a group and with the help of our Nepali friends I feel that we did our best to help.

My thanks and gratitude to Tapan, Mitra and Bhim for taking the extra steps to ‘do the right thing’!

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So glad you were able to help!

2 months ago
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trifc.orgIt was such a coincidence for us to happen to stop at that point on our way back to Pokhara...everyone in our little volunteer group got involved in helping!

2 months ago   ·  1
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Tapan Rajbhandari you are a great guy. Merry Christmas to all

2 months ago   ·  1

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Inspiring. Thanks for all you do!

2 months ago

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I agree; that's really inspiring especially at this time of year. Your team continue to make a difference. All the best.

2 months ago
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